Explain how to support children and young people s self confidence and self esteem

No cleaning products or medicines reachable, for example when we finish to clean the tables with anti-bacterial we need to put the product back out of reach from the children. When an activity is planned, we need to consider that the unexpected or unusual can happen. So when I plan an activity in my setting I need to ensure that the location indoor or outdoor is right for the activity, for example, if I have planned an activity outside that involves running, jumping, etc ,with obstacles, I need to check if is enough space so the children can move safety, if the weather is suitable if it is not raining, or snowingthan I need to ensure that the equipment obstacles are in good condition not broken ,cleanI need to check if there is not any litter or animal mess and also ensure that are there enough adults supervising the children. All member of staff are responsible for Health and Safety in the setting.

Explain how to support children and young people s self confidence and self esteem

Background[ edit ] The idea of death, the fear of it, haunts the human animal like nothing else; it is a mainspring of human activity—activity designed largely to avoid the fatality of death, to overcome it by denying in some way that it is the final destiny for man. They therefore spend their lives building and believing in cultural elements that illustrate how to make themselves stand out as individuals and give their lives significance and meaning.

Death creates an anxiety in humans; it strikes at unexpected and random moments, and its nature is essentially unknowable, causing people to spend most of their time and energy to explain, forestall, and avoid it. Brownand Otto Rank. According to clinical psychiatrist Morton LevittBecker replaces the Freudian preoccupation with sexuality with the fear of death as the primary motivation in human behavior.

This feeling counters the cognitive dissonance created by an individual's realization that they may be no more important than any other living thing. Becker refers to high self-esteem as heroism: Society itself is a codified hero system, which means that society everywhere is a living myth of the significance of human life, a defiant creation of meaning.

Institutional Practices

A research article in Psychological Review proposes a three-part model for understanding how awareness of death can ironically subvert health-promoting behaviors by redirecting one's focus towards behaviors that build self-esteem instead: Proposition 2 suggests that the unconscious resonance of death-related cognition promotes self-oriented defenses directed toward maintaining, not one's health, but a sense of meaning and self-esteem.

The last proposition suggests that confrontations with the physical body may undermine symbolic defenses and thus present a previously unrecognized barrier to health promotion activities. However, generalized existential anxiety resulting from the clash between a desire for life and awareness of the inevitability of death is neither adaptive nor selected for.

TMT views existential anxiety as an unfortunate byproduct of these two highly adaptive human proclivities rather than as an adaptation that the evolutionary process selected for its advantages. Just as human bipedalism confers advantages as well as disadvantages, death anxiety is an inevitable part of our intelligence and awareness of dangers.

Anxiety in response to the inevitability of death threatened to undermine adaptive functioning and therefore needed amelioration. TMT posits that humankind used the same intellectual capacities that gave rise to this problem to fashion cultural beliefs and values that provided protection against this potential anxiety.

TMT considers these cultural beliefs even unpleasant and frightening ones, such as ritual human sacrifice when they manage potential death anxiety in a way that promotes beliefs and behaviors which facilitated the functioning and survival of the collective.

Hunter-gatherers used their emerging cognitive abilities to facilitate solving practical problems, such as basic needs for nutrition, mating, and tool-making. As these abilities evolved, an explicit awareness of death also emerged.

Explain how to support children and young people s self confidence and self esteem

But once this awareness materialized, the potential for terror that it created put pressure on emerging conceptions of reality. Any conceptual formation that was to be widely accepted by the group needed to provide a means of managing this terror.

Originally, the emergence of morality evolved to facilitate co-existence within groups. Together with language, morality served pragmatic functions that extended survival.

The struggle to deny the finality of death co-opted and changed the function of these cultural inventions. For example, Neanderthals might have begun burying their dead as a means of avoiding unpleasant odors, disease-infested parasites, or dangerous scavengers.

Building Self-Confidence

But during the Upper Paleolithic era, these pragmatic burial practices appear to have become imbued with layers of ritual performance and supernatural beliefs, suggested by the elaborate decoration of bodies with thousands of beads or other markers.

Food and other necessities were also included within the burial chamber, indicating the potential for a belief system that included life after death. In many human cultures today, funerals are viewed primarily as cultural events, viewed through the lens of morality and language, with little thought given to the utilitarian origins of burying the dead.

Evolutionary history also indicates that "the costs of ignoring threats have outweighed the costs of ignoring opportunities for self-development.Good information, informed consent and support.

Children and young people and their families need good information, given as part of a collaborative and supportive relationship with healthcare professionals, and need to be able to give fully informed consent.

[] Healthcare professionals involved in the detection, assessment or treatment of children or young people. A new study examines selfies, narcissism, psychopathy and self-objectification. Add to your folder the following: An explanation of how to support children and young people’s self-confidence and self esteem Children who are assertive, self-confident, self-aware and have levels of self-esteem are less likely to be the victims of abuse as they are not vulnerable.

This page, edited by Mark Smith, is introduced to reflect the growing interest in social pedagogy in the UK. A principal focus of the page is residential child care though the ideas which underpin social pedagogy have relevance to the nurture of all children.

In general school and teacher factors have a negative affect on children’s self confidence and their positive attitude to learning;. • Electricity in the home increases the likelihood of scoring higher in all tests;.

Safeguarding: Self-esteem and Children. of safeguarding is to empower the child or young person so that they can develop strategies to protect themselves. Add to your folder the following: An explanation of how to support children and young people’s self-confidence and self esteem Children who are assertive, self-confident, self-aware and have levels of self-esteem are less likely to be the.

Explain how to support children and young people s self confidence and self esteem
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