Guilt in spunk by zora neale

A play she submitted, Color Struck, took second prize for drama. Later that year, the story was included in The New Negro: The anthology became one of a handful of important and widely read collections of the Harlem Renaissancedemonstrating the best of the new writing coming out of black America.

Guilt in spunk by zora neale

It enriches the necessary competencies that daily life requires and provides; and in this respect, it irrigates the deserts that our lives have already become " C. Literature has been, for the longest time, the primary source of escapism.

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Specifically, fiction has had the strongest role in manipulating the imagination of the reader. Fiction, much like literature, has many subcategories. Short stories, perhaps one of the strongest genres, offer a powerful look at the human condition.

Authors of short stories have grown adept at putting down the positive and negative features of being a human being. Many times, these types of stories will include dramatic situations that are plausible in real life.

Hurston was born and raised in Eatonville, Florida and developed a deep love for storytelling there. Masculinity and power are very prevalent within the story. Zora Neale Hurston uses various literary devices that enable the reader to analyze the themes presented in the story.

The mainstay figure of the short story, "Spunk," whom the story is named after, offers a unique example of the believable, appropriate, and curiously unlikable character.

Guilt in spunk by zora neale

Being a flat character, Spunk thinks of himself as the most dominant man in town which fuels his arrogance, as well as his ego, as shown when he says, " This exemplifies Spunk's firm belief that he is the most powerful man not only between him and Joe Kanty, but between him and the rest of the world.

Due to his superiority complex, Spunk exhibits a thirst for control. A perfect example of this complex is when Spunk faces Lena and tells her, "ah'll git the lumber foh owah house to-morrow All of these instances shows how belligerent Spunk is and this ties into the universal theme of masculinity and power.

Although Spunk has shown his full capacity for being aggressive and intrusive, he transforms throughout the story from a dynamic character with arrogance and bravado into one filled with fear and paranoia. In the beginning, Eljah Mosley, a town local, states, "Theah they go, big as life an' brassy as tacks" Hurston.

Toward the end of the story, Spunk becomes fearful of Joe's "spirit". But Spunk says twan't no bob-cat nohow. He says it was Joe done sneaked back from Hell! This phenomenon convinces Spunk that the bobcat is Joe Kanty, back from the dead to avenge his murder. Another significant change is when Spunk becomes decidedly uneasy and jumpy in contrast to his original care-free nature.

Approaching the end of the story, after the hasty wedding with Lena, Spunk becomes more and more anxious. At this point, it is revealed that Spunk is indeed a man, not a monster.

It displays that he has faults, much like everyone else, even though he may have seemed quite the opposite in the beginning. Spunk's only ambition in the story is stealing and marrying Lena. For whatever reason, that is not revealed to the reader, Lena and Joe have had serious marital problems.

The reader is also not privy as to why Spunk is so interested in Lena.

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All that is known is that for whatever reason Spunk has, for all intents and purposes, stolen Lena from Joe.The fact that Spunk is found not guilty of the killing of Joe Kanty in Zora Neale Hurston’s story seems highly questionable, to say the least.

In fact, the crucial paragraph revealing the not. In "Spunk" by Zora Neale Hurston, the main character Joe Kanty's death is the tool used to shape the characters in her story. Following Joe's murder, the characters experience different forms of guilt, representing Hurston's belief that everyone in our world has a conscience.

“Spunk” was only the third short story Zora Neale Hurston published, and it was immediately successful. She had been encouraged to come to New York City by Charles S. Johnson, the editor of the National Urban League’s influential magazine, Opportunity: A Journal of Negro Life, because Johnson had published her second story, “Drenched.

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The Zora Neale Hurston: Short Stories Community Note includes chapter-by-chapter summary and analysis, character list, theme list, historical context, author biography and quizzes written by community members like you.

Sweat is a short story by the American writer Zora Neale Hurston, first published in The story revolves around a washerwoman and her unemployed, insecure husband.

Robert E. Hemenway, the Chancellor of University of Kansas and the author of a biography of Zora Neale Hurston, praised Sweat as "a remarkable work, her best . Download-Theses Mercredi 10 juin

Guilt in "Spunk" by Zora Neale Hurston Essays